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Leaving Cigital/Synopsys After 23 Years

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After 23 years at the same company, much of which I was a senior executive and member of the Board of Directors, I am leaving Synopsys on January 4th. Here is the message I sent to staff on November 9th after deciding to leave in September.

Please note that my email address is now gem@garymcgraw.com (change in all places).  Learn more at http://garymcgraw.com.

hi everyone,

After 23 years of working for the same company in various forms, I will be departing Synopsys in January. Synopsys has turned out to be a good home for Cigital. I am pleased with the progress SIG has made since the acquisition two years ago and its direct impact on the growth of software security as a field. Business is booming, cranks are cranking, and the field is exploding. All of that notwithstanding, the time has come for me to move on.

Pardon me as I wax nostalgic for a few lines. Here are seven things that stand out in my mind when I think back over the last twenty or so years I spent with you guys. I had a blast:

  • Taking on Sun, Netscape, and Microsoft directly during the Java Security years (1996-1998)
  • Releasing of ITS4 (It’s the Software Stupid Security Scanner) in 2000 — the world’s first code scanner for security
  • Publishing “Building Secure Software” in 2001 (the first book in the world on software security)
  • Licensing the DARPA-sponsored Cigital technology behind Fortify to Kleiner Perkins in 2004
  • Launching Silver Bullet in 2005
  • Creating the BSIMM measurement tool with Sammy and Brian Chess in 2009
  • Selling Cigital to Synopsys in 2016

All of these things required a cast of hundreds of dedicated people. We built the field of software security together. Over the years I have had the distinct pleasure of watching as the ideas behind software security became a reality. Thanks for that.

What will I do next? I will remain a fiercely independent participant in the software security conversation. I will serve as a Technical Advisor and Board member to forward-thinking firms. I will continue to collect data, make measurements, and do science. And I will dust off my machine learning and AI chops and see what happens when those fields intersect software security.

I am not disappearing from the planet, so keep in touch. My website http://garymcgraw.com will stay up to date. My preferred email is now gem@garymcgraw.com

gem

Introducing ApothecaryCloud

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Things went so well over at noplasticshowers after I tagged and bagged all the posts that I thought I might just do the same thing here. Without further ado, a bunch of categories (screen right) and a tag cloud. You can click on the live one over there, but not the fake one below!

ApothecaryCloud as seen 1.20.13

ApothecaryCloud as seen 1.20.13

Parking at CSS

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Here’s how to park behind the house at Coal Stove Sink. When you drive across the bridge over Wheat Spring Branch, go left at the fork in the driveway. Then turn off into the yard as shown. Go right past the baby sycamore tree, up the hill, and follow the gravel to the barn. Park there.

How to park by Coal Stove Sink by the barn.

How to park by the barn at Coal Stove Sink.

—-[canned directions]—-

Our place is on the Shenandoah river at 754 Castleman Road, Berryville, VA 22611 around 60 miles from Washington (NOTE that some GPS systems have the house in the wrong location.)

Directions: From DC, get on the Dulles Toll Road (267 West). Then Take the Dulles Greenway Toll road (267) to Leesburg. Get on Route 7 West bypass and go past Leesburg, past Purcellville, and over the Blue Ridge mountain (20 miles). Just after you cross the Shenandoah river on the big bridge, take the first right on route 603 (castleman road).

Castleman winds down by the river. When the road veers back away from the river to the left, our house is the first on the right.

Hey, You, Look Over There

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The Bitter Liberals have their own website now.

http://thebitterliberals.com/

Thank you for surfing apothecaryshed

Scorpions, Dead Birds, and Random Powders

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More loot for the apothecary shed collection from NH. It is important to have a scorpion.

Here’s what the desk looks like mid-winter.

Samples collected for identification by the resident science team.

Solstice party map

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A few party iterations ago (6? 7?), we started asking everyone to park in the field across the creek and walk across the rope bridge to the party. Please don’t park along the road as the authorities frown on that. Enter the field from Castleman Road where the yellow arrow is (not the driveway where the red do not enter thing is).

Enter parking field at yellow arrow gate. Park, then walk across the rope bridge.

—-[canned directions]—-

Our place is on the Shenandoah river at 754 Castleman Road, Berryville, VA 22611 around 60 miles from Washington (NOTE that most GPS systems and google maps have the house in the wrong location.)

Directions: From DC, get on the Dulles Toll Road (267 West). Then Take the Dulles Greenway Toll road (267) to Leesburg. Get on Route 7 West bypass and go past Leesburg, past Purcellville, and over the Blue Ridge mountain (20 miles). Just after you cross the Shenandoah river on the big bridge, take the first right on route 603 (castleman road).

Castleman winds down by the river. When the road veers back away from the river to the left, our house is the first on the right.

Syntax error on line 0

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The apothecary shed is a place to do science, identify some plants, make some concoctions, and generally think about life, the universe and everything.  There are a bunch of us here who may or may not contribute to this blog.  Perhaps we’ll talk about guests in the adjoining Coal Stove Sink complex.  Or maybe we’ll discuss mushroom identification.  We’ll just have to see.

The apothecary shed and its adjoining mushroom ring.

The shed is yellow with purple trim. It has a porch with a picnic table. Inside, we’ve amassed a collection of nature items, specimens, notes, bones, and beakers.

The work table.

Some of the specimens we have piled up.