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Argentina Art

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Bellas Artes museum, Buenos Aires

MALBA, Buenos Aires

Art in the Open: Hakone Japan

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The Hakone Outdoor Museum is Fantastic

An outdoor sculpture garden in the mountains of Japan. What more could you want?

Submitted mostly without comment. Skip the Picasso. Go for the Moore.

Potato Stone: Youngblood Art Mosaic

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Our friend Tia Maggio just opened a shared space show, Mosaic, at youngblood in The Plains. The show also features sculpture by Chilean artist Carlos Edwards.

Shades of Blue by Tia Maggio

Shades of Blue by Tia Maggio

Carlos Edwards

Carlos Edwards

Tia Maggio on point

Tia Maggio on point

Tia’s new work, interspersed with pictures from previous phases, was inspired by time in Moroco.

Going Out with a  Bang by Tia Maggio

Going Out with a Bang by Tia Maggio

What's the Matterhorn by Tia Maggio

What’s the Matterhorn by Tia Maggio

Carlos Edwards

Carlos Edwards

Carlos Edwards told me about working with a stack of potatoes as inspiration for some of his work in granite. So remember: test the water with your potatoes before you jump in.

Also Carlos Edwards

Also Carlos Edwards

Memories of You by Tia Maggio

Memories of You by Tia Maggio

We added a third Tia piece to our collection. What appealed to us in this piece was the depth of field.

Bouquet by Tia Maggio

Bouquet by Tia Maggio

Catch the show while it is still on, and while you’re in town, have a margarita or two (enhanced with extra tequila and lime) at El Agave.

The best place to eat in the Plains? El Agave, hands down.

The best place to eat in the Plains? El Agave, hands down.

Ripped Out By the Roots (Middleburg Dairy Barn Art)

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Sunday afternoon started out idyllic enough. The setting for the Dairy Barn Gallery outside of Middleburg is about as pretty as Virginia gets.

IMG_2126

A collection of great artists and good friends, including: Maureen Limon, Winslow McCagg, Anna Billman and Richard Lew (with six others) brought the space to life.

Winslow McCagg

Winslow McCagg

Anna Billman

Anna Billman

Richard Lew

Richard Lew

Maureen Limon

Maureen Limon

But then things took a turn for the macabre. First there was the prayer wheel made by the robot overlords and thrust back in time.

And then there was the bedroom/bathroom pair of spigots (credit to Charley Billman for the perfect naming scheme). Look left. Look right. Giggle.

Sometimes up and sometimes down (Anna Billman)

Sometimes up and sometimes down (Anna Billman)

But in the end we were threatened by the horseradish root and beat a hasty retreat.

This could be you, male. (Anna Billman)

This could be you, male. (Anna Billman)

River Art and the problem of the Bits

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I’ve always admired the environmental art of Goldsworthy (we saw some at Stanford this year). A few years ago Eli and I started moving rocks around in the river, building walls and swimming holes, sitting rocks and natural jacuzzis. It’s gotten pretty big over the years. I tried capturing the installation in bits this year. Not so easy.

Maybe a video?

Or two?

One of the features of the river art are a series of really huge sitting rocks. They are spaced out according to hours, making a chronograph of sorts (and allowing a river visitor to stay in the sun on a rock until 7pm-ish).

The 4 o’clock rock.

The 5 o’clock rock.

The 6 o’clock rock.

The 7 o’clock rock.

Each rock is surrounded by walls in a round “pod.” The pods are connected with walls and trails cleared of big rocks. This is tje 7 o’clock pod.

The wall of the swimming hole, which was our first major project a few years ago.

But really, what’s this all for? Let my co-creator demonstrate.

College and the Arts: Stanford

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Stanford has 400+ acres of campus. At least 4 of them are devoted to art, with the Rodin Sculpture garden and the Stone River Goldsworthy installation.

Rodin

It was a gorgeous day. It almost always is here in Palo Alto.

Classic stanford architecture with rich guy trees.

Who knew the Gates of Hell were at Stanford?!

By far the best part of the art pile at Stanford is the Stone River installation. It’s a good thing Brian told us to look for it. Make sure to see this when you go to the Cantor Museum for sure. Goldworthy is very good. And I love stone walls. Eli and I build structures in the river every summer. Sure would be fun to make them more like this!

Stone River. Across the parking lot and hidden in plain sight.

Stonework by masters.